Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

How Old is My Mexican Fender Stratocaster?

In the early to mid-1980s Fender realized that labor and shipping costs overseas were being to rise, so Fender decided it would be easier to set up a plant in Ensenada, Mexico. Fender Mexico was established May 5, 1987. Fender started producing guitars in its 200,000 sq. ft. Ensenada plant in 1990. Due to production times and shipping dates, there is an overlap between each years guitars. That is why each number has two years of production.


1990 – 1999 Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Mexican Fender Serial Number

As with all Fender serial numbers, the Mexican Fender serial numbers are inconsistent and change patterns a few times. The Mexican serial numbers start by following the same lettering pattern that American Fender guitar had in the 1990s using the letter “N” to indicate the 1990s. The letter “N” is followed by a number that indicates the specific year of production.

To differentiate these guitars from the American guitars, Fender decided to add an “M” in front of the serial numbers that stood for Mexico. So MN100001 was a Mexican Fender guitar built in 1991-1992. All of the “MN#” serial numbers are then followed by five or six digits like this.

1990 – 1999 Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Numbers Years
MN0 + 5 of 6 Digits 1990 – 1991
MN1 + 5 of 6 Digits 1991 – 1992
MN2 + 5 of 6 Digits 1992 – 1993
MN3 + 5 of 6 Digits 1993 – 1994
MN4 + 5 of 6 Digits 1994 – 1995
MN5 + 5 of 6 Digits 1995 – 1996
MN6 + 5 of 6 Digits 1996 – 1997
MN7 + 5 of 6 Digits 1997 – 1998
MN8 + 5 of 6 Digits 1998 – 1999
MN9 + 5 of 6 Digits 1999 – 2000

2000 – 2009 Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Made in Mexico Fender Stratocaster Serial Number

After 1999, Fender switched its Mexican serial number system to “MZ#” numbers. Just like the American Fenders, the “Z” stood for zero or the 2000s.

Just like the “MN#” numbers, the first number in the serial number stood for the specific year of production. Each “MZ#” was followed by five or six digits like this.

2000 – 2009 Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Numbers Years
MZ0 + 5 or 6 Digits 2000 – 2001
MZ1 + 5 or 6 Digits 2001 – 2002
MZ2 + 5 or 6 Digits 2002 – 2003
MZ3 + 5 or 6 Digits 2003 – 2004
MZ4 + 5 or 6 Digits 2004 – 2005
MZ5 + 5 or 6 Digits 2005 – 2006
MZ6 + 5 or 6 Digits 2006 – 2007
MZ7 + 5 or 6 Digits 2007 – 2008
MZ8 + 5 or 6 Digits 2008 – 2009
MZ9 + 5 or 6 Digits 2009 – 2010

2009 – 2010 Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Ok. So everything was pretty simple up to this point, right? Fender didn’t screw it up too much so far. Well, then comes 2010. Now the “Z” can’t be used for a serial number. Fender decided to switch to using the number 10 instead of a letter prefix. The number 10 was supposed to represent the first year of the second decade in the new millennium. Confusing, right? So starting in late 2009, guitars were being produced with the number 10 with a space followed by seven or eight digits.

These new serial numbers didn’t actually track the country of origin. Instead, you have to rely on the “Made in” decal on the headstock to find out where the guitar was made. Another oddity of these guitars is that Fender’s computers had a glitch and only recorded the seven-digit serial number. The number 10 prefix was not recorded in their operations systems. Obviously, Fender had to do something about this, so it changed the serial number scheme a few months later. Only late 2009 to March 2010 Fender guitars will have a “10 0000001” serial number.

2009 – 2010 Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Numbers Years
10 (space) + 7 or 8 Digits Late 2009 – March 2010

2010 – Present Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Mexican Fender Stratocaster Serial Number

Once Fender saw the errors in the old system, they decided to go back to the previous lettering serial number schemes. This way the country of origin and the date of production can be coded into the serial number.

This time they chose the letter “X” to represent the second decade of the 2000s. The first two letters following the “MX” serial numbers indicate the year of production. After the “MX##” prefix, six digits were added.

2010 – Present Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Numbers Years
MX10 + 6 Digits 2010 – 2011
MX11 + 6 Digits 2011 – 2012
MX12 + 6 Digits 2012 – 2013

Other Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Mexican Fender Signature Series

Mexican Fender Signature Serial Number

It wouldn’t be like Fender, if there weren’t some kind of exceptions to the exceptions. Some signature models like the Jim Root Telecaster, James Burton Standard Telecaster, Buddy Guy Stratocaster (polka dot model), Robert Cray Stratocaster, and Jimmie Vaughan Stratocaster substituted an “MS#” serial number for the standard “MX#” number.

The “S” stood for signature. Only a few signature models were converted over to the”MX10″ numbering system in October 2010. However, the Reggie Hamilton and Frank Bello Jazz basses used an “MX” serial number prefix before the 2010 change.

Signature Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Numbers Years
MSN0 + 5 Digits 1990 – 1991
MSN1 + 5 Digits 1991 – 1992
MSN2 + 5 Digits 1992 – 1993
MSN3 + 5 Digits 1993 – 1994
MSN4 + 5 Digits 1994 – 1995
MSN5 + 5 Digits 1995 – 1996
MSN6 + 5 Digits 1996 – 1997
MSN7 + 5 Digits 1997 – 1998
MSN8 + 5 Digits 1998 – 1999
MSN9 + 5 Digits 1999 – 2000
MS0 + 5 or 6 Digits 2000 – 2001
MS1 + 5 or 6 Digits 2001 – 2002
MS2 + 5 or 6 Digits 2002 – 2003
MS3 + 5 or 6 Digits 2003 – 2004
MS4 + 5 or 6 Digits 2004 – 2005
MS5 + 5 or 6 Digits 2005 – 2006
MS6 + 5 or 6 Digits 2006 – 2007
MS7 + 5 or 6 Digits 2007 – 2008
MS8 + 5 or 6 Digits 2008 – 2009
MS9 + 5 or 6 Digits 2009 – 2010

Other signature guitar like the Ritchie Blackmore Stratocaster and Duff McKagan P Bass used a “MSZ” serial number rather than the “MS#” number.


Mexican Fender California Series

Mexican Fender California Series Serial Number

Fender also made a series of guitars in 1997 and 1998 that were produced and assembled in both the US and Mexico. These California Series guitars and basses use an “AMX#” prefix to indicate that they were made in America and Mexico.

California Series Mexican Fender Serial Numbers

Numbers Years
AMX7 + 6 Digits 1997 – 1998
AMX8 + 6 Digits 1997 – 1998

I hope that wasn’t too confusing for you. Fender has always been good at keeping us guessing with their numbering systems. The Mexican guitars are no exceptions. I hope this article helped you understand your Mexican Fender guitar serial number and figure out how your guitar is. Now it’s time to get back to playing!

You can also find more information on the Fender site.


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5 thoughts on “Mexican Fender Serial Numbers”

  1. i’m unclear …
    so the Mexican Fenders with authentic serial numbers are as valuable and perform as well as the USA made. Correct? because Sam’s Guitar or Guitar center has an pretty Fender Strat going for 600 dollars… that price sounds like an authentic USA price? i can buy an fender made in Mexico in a pawn shop for 75 dollars… so, please clarify the value of these Mexican and Korean made instruments… thank you

  2. $600 does not sound like an authentic American made price for a new Strat. A new American made Strat is going to run double that or more. Sometimes you can find a bare bones version for around $1000. Mexican made Fenders are not horrible, but they are not equal to their American counterparts. They use cheaper components, lesser grade woods, and do not have the meticulous American craftsmanship behind them. I am working now on refurbishing a 1991 Mexican made Fender P bass, and the wiring is a mess. The standard P bass pots are supposed to be 250k pots. This one has factory installed 500k pots. The reason? It’s made in Mexico, and Fender must have had a line on some cheap 500k pots. This would never happen on an American model. Bottom line however, it’s still a Fender, and you could do a lot worse. $75 in a pawn shop sounds pretty good – if everything is functional. Hope that helps.

  3. As usual, I’m even more confused now. I have an MO prefix with SEVEN digits following. I think it may have been an overproduction “limited” piece that went to my local shop. Ideas?

  4. Still doesn’t tell me what year my strat was made. Too many variables, ok, between 1990 and 2000..jeeze. And yes, Mexican strats these days are just as good and sometimes better than American made ones. Tone with mine is much better. Mix between a tele and strat. LOVE my guitar. Played it since 1998, believe it’s a ’96. Lots of voice, tone and very usuable over many styles.

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